Film: Design & Architecture

The Divorce of Lady X

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The Divorce of Lady X is a 1938 romantic comedy starring Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon. This delightful slice of escapism, produced by Alexander Korda, was shot in three strip Technicolor, showing off both the expensive sets and Olivier’s green-shirt-and-brown-suit combo to best effect.

Most of the stills that I captured were from the first part of the film in Laurence’s hotel room. Between the colors, patterns, and textures, there was too much to take in watching it as a film. Fortunately for me, there are “ways” to get around this. And hopefully, I won’t get into any trouble for posting these stills. But I had to capture all of this eye candy and share it with you.

(above) This is the only frame that captured both beds with some of the architectural detailing. Were hotel rooms back then really this elaborate? I want that phone.
(above) This is the only frame that captured both beds with some of the architectural detailing. Were hotel rooms back then really this elaborate? I want that phone.
(above) This door is gorgeous. I'm not sure that it's suppose to have that purplish mauve color. It's the way it was made that I'm fascinated with, the fabrication of it. Perhaps it's veneer.
(above) This door is gorgeous. I’m not sure that it’s suppose to have that purplish mauve color. It’s the way it was made that I’m fascinated with, the fabrication of it. Perhaps it’s veneer.
(above) Texture and color choices. Check out the headboard and wall coverings.
(above) Texture and color choices. Check out the headboard and wall coverings.
(above) Notice that the wall covering behind the headboard has shiny gold thingies. Even her pajama's color combination coordinates with her surroundings.
(above) Notice that the wall covering behind the headboard has shiny gold thingies. Even her pajama’s color combination coordinates with her surroundings.
(above) Then there is the bathroom where the door with its trim matches the pedestal sink.
(above) Then there is the bathroom where the door with its trim matches the pedestal sink.
(above) Navy and periwinkle blues against a lush muted wall color. Note how she matches her bed.
(above) Navy and periwinkle blues against a lush muted wall color. Note how she matches her bed.
(above) Here's a much closer view of that same door I mentioned earlier. And that's it for today.
(above) Here’s a much closer view of that same door I mentioned earlier. And that’s it for today.

2 thoughts on “The Divorce of Lady X”

  1. Houses Gardens People says:

    I love old Hollywood movie set decor, and have never seen this movie. Thank you for showing it to us. I can’t wait to try to rent it. I have a bunch of stills from Vertigo that I painstakingly collected one night while I was watching it, and haven’t done anything with them except admire the color combinations of the cars and Kim Novak’s clothes.

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Rebecca, I’ve been keeping a list of films to capture stills from. I own quite a few of the dvds but can’t afford to buy anymore at the moment. So what I plan to do is rent them from Netflix for the capturing.

      Speaking of Kim Novak, one film on my list is “Boys’ Night Out” (1962) with James Garner and Kim Novak. Their apartment with the kitchen’s turquoise finishes and the bedroom’s silver gray and coral fabrics is major eye candy. And then there’s “A Hole in the Head” (1959) with Frank Sinatra, Edward G. Robinson, and Eleanor Parker. Eleanor’s kitchen has pink finishes. Another film on my list is “Point Blank” (1967) with Lee Marvin & Angie Dickenson. The ugly heavy pseudo Spanish interiors with olive, burnt orange, and dirty gold fabrics are hoot to look at now. And there’s also a hideous swimming pool setup that looks like it belongs to Long John Silvers with it’s wooden bridges and fake lagoons. But since capturing the stills after breaking through the encryption codes, brightening and sharpening in photoshop, and etc is extremely time consuming, I’ll only be doing one film a month on average. I think.

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