Landscape & Gardening

The New Front Garden

The front bed is deeper now.
The front bed is deeper now.

Larger planting beds and less grass means less maintenance. With the exception of three Turk’s Cap shrubs, the front garden is now complete. Because of the newly extended beds, the removal of the not-so-hot-looking plants, the transplanting of some of the original perennials, and the addition of shade tolerant perennials, I’m hoping that I won’t need to be putting in the insane amount of maintenance hours that have been required over the last few summers. Looking at the above and following photos, you may think that things look a bit tiny and insignificant. Just you wait. In July or August, I’ll be taking new photos, and you will definitely see a big difference.

(above) This view includes the original stone bed.
(above) This view includes the original stone bed.
(above) There are stepping stone paths meandering through both beds.
(above) There are stepping stone paths meandering through both beds.
(above) The two spindly shrubs (flowering quince) that you see here in the center of the photograph were originally way back in the corner. Perhaps you remember them from previous posts. We’re hoping that they will begin to flourish now that they have more light.
(above) The two spindly shrubs (flowering quince) that you see here in the center of the photograph were originally way back in the corner. Perhaps you remember them from previous posts. We’re hoping that they will begin to flourish now that they have more light.
(above) Here’s another view of the converging stone paths. Notice how one stone is halfway into the bed. The steel edging had to be cut out in order for the stone to overlap. Pretty ingenious. Right?
(above) Here’s another view of the converging stone paths. Notice how one stone is halfway into the bed. The steel edging had to be cut out in order for the stone to overlap. Pretty ingenious. Right?
(above) Originally I had two groups of tall Louisiana irises. There were only three months out of the year when they would stand vertically and give us a good show. During the remainder, they were a broken floppy mess. Behind the fountain to the right is their replacement, spider lilies. The Texas Spider Lily foliage won’t be as tall as the iris, but will still provide a desirable spiky look while not succumbing to our intense summers.
(above) Originally I had two groups of tall Louisiana irises. There were only three months out of the year when they would stand vertically and give us a good show. During the remainder, they were a broken floppy mess. Behind the fountain to the right is their replacement, spider lilies. The Texas Spider Lily foliage won’t be as tall as the iris, but will still provide a desirable spiky look while not succumbing to our intense summers.

landscape architect: Michael Parkey
landscape contractor: Hadden Landscaping
irrigation and lighting: Fellows Irrigation Services

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