Landscape & Gardening

What’s Blooming Now

This is the only way to make concrete look good. With Four-nerve daisies (Tetraneuris scaposa) mixed in with Dwarf Coreopsis (Coreopsis auricular ‘Nana’) at the base of my Texas Whitebud tree and a backdrop of sundrops, who will notice the concrete?
This is the only way to make concrete look good. With Four-nerve daisies (Tetraneuris scaposa) mixed in with Dwarf Coreopsis (Coreopsis auricular ‘Nana’) at the base of my Texas Whitebud tree and a backdrop of sundrops, who will notice the concrete?

Today is blooming Earth Day, and I have some bodacious beauties to share with you. I took these photos about a week ago thinking the predicted week of rain would destroy their beautiful massing effect. The sun’s back out today, and they have fortunately recovered. Though I’m glad I shot them earlier on a cloudy day, because these particular areas do not photograph well in full sun. Dappled shade would be ideal, but these flowers are either in full sun or full shade. For more photos of the blooming bits of my garden, click the link below.

(above) Calylophus hartwegii ‘Texas Gold’. I thought these sundrops looked good last year, but when you compare, you can see how much they have grown.
(above) Calylophus hartwegii ‘Texas Gold’. I thought these sundrops looked good last year, but when you compare, you can see how much they have grown.
(above) Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’. Bees and butterflies love these Pincushion flowers. It’s the busiest grouping in my front yard.
(above) Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’. Bees and butterflies love these Pincushion flowers. It’s the busiest grouping in my front yard.
(above) The purple blue flower is Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’. These two rows were planted last spring replacing the Blue mist flower which refused to thrive after two years, and I do believe there could have been no better choice. The bees and butterflies are unbelievably crazy busy here! The back two rows with the pink flowers are Salvia greggi ‘Pink Preference’. Sadly, my beautiful roses that were once behind these plantings were pulled out last fall after signs of the dreaded Rose Rosette disease showed up in places. I am now trying to locate eight five-gallon pots of an old garden favorite called Rose of Sharon, a.k.a. althea, Hibiscus syriacus. I desperately need them to screen out my neighbor’s “collection.”
(above) The purple blue flower is Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’. These two rows were planted last spring replacing the Blue mist flower which refused to thrive after two years, and I do believe there could have been no better choice. The bees and butterflies are unbelievably crazy busy here! The back two rows with the pink flowers are Salvia greggi ‘Pink Preference’. Sadly, my beautiful roses that were once behind these plantings were pulled out last fall after signs of the dreaded Rose Rosette disease showed up in places. I am now trying to locate eight five-gallon pots of an old garden favorite called Rose of Sharon, a.k.a. althea, Hibiscus syriacus. I desperately need them to screen out my neighbor’s “collection.”

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