Landscape & Gardening

Done Except for One

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Except for the caladiums, all summer annuals have been planted. I wanted to wait another week before planting the bulbs, because they have a much shorter life span than the other annuals. I take photos at the beginning and at the end of each season to keep as a record of the placement, size, and quantity of my seasonal choices. So keep in mind while viewing the photos in this post, that you are looking at plants that have yet to grow to their full potential, and those unsightly bare spots will soon fill in.

(above from bottom to top) Pineapple Coleus, Bat Face Cuphea, more coleus, and Red Pentas
(above from bottom to top) Pineapple Coleus, Bat Face Cuphea, more coleus, and Red Pentas
(above) It may look spotty at the moment, but the coleus and ornamental grasses will increase in size, and the soon-to-be-planted caladium bulbs will fill in the remaining voids.
(above) It may look spotty at the moment, but the coleus and ornamental grasses will increase in size, and the soon-to-be-planted caladium bulbs will fill in the remaining voids.
(above) The Kong Rose Coleus adds some pop to a dark corner, while the Persian Shield adds height and depth.
(above) The Kong Rose Coleus adds some pop to a dark corner, while the Persian Shield adds height and depth.
(above) Here's another dark corner in need of some bright color. Hopefully the bright red/orange of the Bat Face Cuphea and Dragon Wing Begonia will do the job.
(above) Here’s another dark corner in need of some bright color. Hopefully the bright red/orange of the Bat Face Cuphea and Dragon Wing Begonia will do the job.
(above) Let's get up close and personal with a Bat Face. Notice the fangs? There are other Cuphea versions of this breed, but they have never performed as well in my garden as this good ol' variety.
(above) Let’s get up close and personal with a Bat Face. Notice the fangs? There are other Cuphea versions of this breed, but they have never performed as well in my garden as this good ol’ variety.
(above left to right) Pineapple Coleus, Diamond Frost Euphorbia, Red Pentas. The big glossy heart-shaped leaves belong to a perennial called Chinese Wild Ginger.
(above left to right) Pineapple Coleus, Diamond Frost Euphorbia, Red Pentas. The big glossy heart-shaped leaves belong to a perennial called Chinese Wild Ginger.
(above) In the lower left hand corner is a variegated annual called Stromanthe Tricolor. The low growing perennial in the bottom middle is called Sedum sarmentosum ‘Yellow Moss’. And down in the right bottom corner, there's the pink leaf annual, Syngonium Neon Tetra.
(above) In the lower left hand corner is a variegated annual called Stromanthe Tricolor. The low growing perennial in the bottom middle is called Sedum sarmentosum ‘Yellow Moss’. And down in the right bottom corner, there’s the pink leaf annual, Syngonium Neon Tetra.
(above) You know all the plants in this photo except for the perennial in the lower right corner. This is my famous Japanese Anemone that blooms from mid-September through the end of October. This year it has decided to increase its real estate. Between it and the sedum, I don't know which has become the greedier.
(above) You know all the plants in this photo except for the perennial in the lower right corner. This is my famous Japanese Anemone that blooms from mid-September through the end of October. This year it has decided to increase its real estate. Between it and the sedum, I don’t know which has become the greedier.

3 thoughts on “Done Except for One”

  1. Pat Bracken says:

    Patsy Ann,
    Your garden is really beautiful and the photos are so crisp and bright! I see that you have a shady yard like I do. Thanks for your blog.

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Thanks, Pat! Yep… my front garden is a bit toooo shady. Now when the backyard landscaping is finished, two thirds of that will be a sun garden, and there I can rely on the perennials for color. My front garden will always be my problem child. The only things that thrive there are mosquitos and slugs.

  2. Pat Bracken says:

    Yeah, Dallas means dry shade and most gardening books show moist shade–like in Houston. A real challenge.

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