Interior Design

Table Setting (version one)

Detail view showcasing my new William Yeoward crystal goblets purchased through Neiman Marcus.
Detail view showcasing my new William Yeoward crystal goblets purchased through Neiman Marcus.

This dress rehearsal had been long overdue. Mixing the old, the inherited, and the new on my new forty-eight inch round dining table has worried me for quite some time. I knew it would be a challenge. And after setting up this first arrangement with place mats, it’s now obvious that only four guests can be accommodated. If I were to have five or six guests, I would need to use a linen tablecloth with one or two additional and much smaller chairs, and limit the number of items at each setting. But since I don’t own a tablecloth or the two smaller chairs, I’m only allowed to have three guests for now. If you feel inclined to see more and read up on the details, continue on for more.

(above) When using place mats, only four guests can be accommodated. The Madeira place mats and coasters are from my maternal grandparents’ estate.
(above) When using place mats, only four guests can be accommodated. The Madeira place mats and coasters are from my maternal grandparents’ estate.
(above) I splurged on a set of monogrammed napkins from Leontine Linens. The linen fabric is ivory, and the monogram thread color is Ice Ballet #9028. The monogram itself is the Addison style. The porcelain was my parents’ wedding china, Lenox Olympia-Platinum from 1954. It’s not valuable, but the color and shape is superior to the platinum banded porcelain being produced now. I love how the centers of the plates and bowls are smooth and do not have that typical inner circular depression.
(above) I splurged on a set of monogrammed napkins from Leontine Linens. The linen fabric is ivory, and the monogram thread color is Ice Ballet #9028. The monogram itself is the Addison style. The porcelain was my parents’ wedding china, Lenox Olympia-Platinum from 1954. It’s not valuable, but the color and shape is superior to the platinum banded porcelain being produced now. I love how the centers of the plates and bowls are smooth and do not have that typical inner circular depression.
(above) The sterling flatware is French and dates from the mid-nineteenth century. It was their organic shape and simplicity that attracted me, because you see, I am not fond of overly ornate flatware. When the flatware is turned over with the tines’ and spoon bowls’ backs facing up, as they do in French table settings, the monograms are exposed. The vermeil version is from a second set of smaller sizes. By the way, antique sterling is a tiny fraction of the cost of brand new sterling.
(above) The sterling flatware is French and dates from the mid-nineteenth century. It was their organic shape and simplicity that attracted me, because you see, I am not fond of overly ornate flatware. When the flatware is turned over with the tines’ and spoon bowls’ backs facing up, as they do in French table settings, the monograms are exposed. The vermeil version is from a second set of smaller sizes. By the way, antique sterling is a tiny fraction of the cost of brand new sterling.
(above) My knives with their organic ivory handles complement my sterling flatware, but do not match. In France, sterling silver was typically given as a wedding gift without the inclusion of knives. The tradition is that knives are considered (as a gift) to be indicative of the breaking or ending of a relationship. You might send a knife to a neighbor you really hate and wish to never speak to again, for instance, and the message will be well taken. Consequently, when knives were purchased later, they never matched the forks and spoons. The owner of the shop where I purchased the knives and flatware always provides generous descriptions and interesting historical tidbits with all her items. If you’re curious visit her online shop, Antiques & Uncommon Treasure on Ruby Lane.
(above) My knives with their organic ivory handles complement my sterling flatware, but do not match. In France, sterling silver was typically given as a wedding gift without the inclusion of knives. The tradition is that knives are considered (as a gift) to be indicative of the breaking or ending of a relationship. You might send a knife to a neighbor you really hate and wish to never speak to again, for instance, and the message will be well taken. Consequently, when knives were purchased later, they never matched the forks and spoons. The owner of the shop where I purchased the knives and flatware always provides generous descriptions and interesting historical tidbits with all her items. If you’re curious visit her online shop, Antiques & Uncommon Treasure on Ruby Lane.
(above) The flower arrangement, created by Cebolla Fine Flowers, is in my maternal grandparents' Wedgwood Jasperware biscuit barrel. The tiny salt cellars are by Georg Jensen, and they too, belonged to my maternal grandparents.
(above) The flower arrangement, created by Cebolla Fine Flowers, is in my maternal grandparents’ Wedgwood Jasperware biscuit barrel. The tiny salt cellars are by Georg Jensen, and they too, belonged to my maternal grandparents.

3 thoughts on “Table Setting (version one)”

  1. gigi says:

    BEAUTIFUL!!!!

  2. Saira says:

    Setting a beautiful table is art. Another one you have mastered!

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Thanks, so much, you two! Now it’s time for the hard part–learning to cook. Learning to cook things that will look good on porcelain.

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