Interior Design

Illuminating the Recesses

This is one of four Barovier glass sconces produced in Murano, Italy, circa 1940.
This is one of four Barovier glass sconces produced in Murano, Italy, circa 1940.

These four new, but old, sconces will add some much needed light to my north-facing dining room. For some time now, I’ve been aware that my library/dining room needed more sparkle or illumination after dark. I can always use candles for dining, but what about those other evenings when there’s company for cocktails and such? Guests would arrive through the front door into a well lit living room and then cross through the dark dining room on their way to the kitchen and back areas of the house. Relying on the overhead ceiling fixture as the only light source was less than optimal, because the space has been too well designed to consign the book cabinets to the shadows. Charley McKenney, my architect, came up with the sconce concept which is something I originally didn’t think was feasible. We did consider other sconces, including a custom design, before he found these fixtures at John Gregory Studio in Dallas’ Design District.

The next step was to find an electrician who could do this unusual installation. Since my general contractor and his electrician were tied up on another job, I called Wade Electric, who I had used before I started my home’s restoration. If you ever have a tricky perhaps fancy lighting situation that has you stumped, call Wade Electric. Thank you, Jesse, for all your expertise! To see the sconces illuminated and photos of the entire space, click on the link below.

(above) This shows the placement of all four sconces. Unfortunately, during this time of year, autumn, my north-facing rooms don’t receive much natural daylight. So this photo is a bit dim.
(above) This shows the placement of all four sconces. Unfortunately, during this time of year, autumn, my north-facing rooms don’t receive much natural daylight. So this photo is a bit dim.
(above) The sconces are turned on by a remote control device, and the switch is located in the attic.
(above) The sconces are turned on by a remote control device, and the switch is located in the attic.
(above) Here you can see all four illuminated. Some day I will take a photo with these, the overhead, and candles lit during the evening.
(above) Here you can see all four illuminated. Some day I will take a photo with these, the overhead, and candles lit during the evening.

3 thoughts on “Illuminating the Recesses”

  1. Saira says:

    Just lovely!!!

  2. Patsy Ann says:

    Thanks, Saira!

  3. Abby says:

    Absolutely Stunning. Thank you for sharing

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