Landscape & Gardening

What’s Blooming Now

Ajuga ‘Chocolate Chip’ (the purple flowers) the will send it up blooms before it produces new leaves.
Ajuga ‘Chocolate Chip’ (the purple flowers) the will send it up blooms before it produces new leaves.

Spring has sprung here in Dallas. Unfortunately a lot of the blooming perennials I showed you last year didn’t make it after last year’s weather extremes and some bad luck. I’ve replaced some of them this past fall, but most will have to be purchased this spring when they become available. What has been replaced is doing very well. Because of our mild winter with no freezing temperatures, the root systems were able to grow the entire winter and are now well established. But it will take another two years to get to where their predecessors were before last spring’s El Niño killed them.

(above) My experiment of mixing Four-nerve daisies (Tetraneuris scaposa) with Dwarf Coreopsis (Coreopsis auricular ‘Nana’) at the base of my Texas Whitebud tree seems to be working out well. I need to add more of the Coreopsis when they become available later this spring.
(above) My experiment of mixing Four-nerve daisies (Tetraneuris scaposa) with Dwarf Coreopsis (Coreopsis auricular ‘Nana’) at the base of my Texas Whitebud tree seems to be working out well. I need to add more of the Coreopsis when they become available later this spring.
(above) In the shade portion of my backyard garden, there’s a patch of Coral Bells (Heuchera cultivars). Originally Oxalis triangularis (False Shamrock) had been planted there, but after a second try and two growing seasons, the Oxalis refused to thrive. So I planted the Coral Bells. But now the Oxalis has decided to join the party, and the Coral Bells aren't as abundant. I think last year's long El Niño season caused their root systems to rot.
(above) In the shade portion of my backyard garden, there’s a patch of Coral Bells (Heuchera cultivars). Originally Oxalis triangularis (False Shamrock) had been planted there, but after a second try and two growing seasons, the Oxalis refused to thrive. So I planted the Coral Bells. But now the Oxalis has decided to join the party, and the Coral Bells aren’t as abundant. I think last year’s long El Niño season caused their root systems to rot.

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