Landscape & Gardening

The Big Reveal!

This view is looking southwest towards the alley.
This view is looking southwest towards the alley.

A longtime dream has finally come true. Thank you Michael Parkey and Hadden Landscaping for the best looking backyard ever! Today the copper path lights are being installed, so you will not see them in this post’s photos. Don’t worry, I will be doing a photoshoot of them sometime in the near future. Except for the front gates, everything has been completed and is now ready for drive by viewings, and don’t be surprised if you spy me on my back screen porch sipping a cocktail and enjoying the view.

Note: You can click on each photo for a much larger version.

(above) Do you think birds will actually nest in the yellow house? The plants in the shade garden are Purple Oxalis, Chinese Wild Ginger, Texas Gold Columbine, Wood Fern, Coral Bark Japanese Maple, Oakleaf Hydrangea, Sea Oats, and Mondo Grass.
(above) Do you think birds will actually nest in the yellow house? The plants in the shade garden are Purple Oxalis, Chinese Wild Ginger, Texas Gold Columbine, Wood Fern, Coral Bark Japanese Maple, Oakleaf Hydrangea, Sea Oats, and Mondo Grass.
(above) From left to right: Sea Oats, Aspidistra, Culinary Sage, and Greek Oregano
(above) From left to right: Sea Oats, Aspidistra, Culinary Sage, and Greek Oregano
(above) Fire Witch Dianthus is planted along the long edge of the greenhouse.
(above) Fire Witch Dianthus is planted along the long edge of the greenhouse.
(above) A close-up view of the Fire Witch Dianthus
(above) A close-up view of the Fire Witch Dianthus
(above) View from the alley looking northwest. Plants in the foreground are Black and Blue Sage and Mexican Feather Grass. In the pot, a Yellow Yucca has been planted.
(above) View from the alley looking northwest. Plants in the foreground are Black and Blue Sage and Mexican Feather Grass. In the pot, a Yellow Yucca has been planted.
(above) Looking northeast from the alley. On either side of the brick terrace is a Hill’s Hardy Rosemary.
(above) Looking northeast from the alley. On either side of the brick terrace is a Hill’s Hardy Rosemary.
(above) In the foreground, you will find Blue Mist Flower and Texas Betony, and just beyond is White Gaura. The shrub in the top right corner is a Texas Lilac Vitex, which in a year or two, we will be pruning into a more tree-like form.
(above) In the foreground, you will find Blue Mist Flower and Texas Betony, and just beyond is White Gaura. The shrub in the top right corner is a Texas Lilac Vitex, which in a year or two, we will be pruning into a more tree-like form.
(above) Butterflies are everywhere all day long.
(above) Butterflies are everywhere all day long.
(above) My west neighbor was a child during the Depression, and as a result, he collects things that could be “useful”. Lots and lots of things. I have a row of antique roses along the fence that will eventually grow and screen out his “stuff”, but I’m not in any kind of hurry to lose my neighbor. He has been wonderful, kind, and very helpful for the 26 years I have lived here. If he were to leave, a builder would come in to bulldoze and build a huge monster of a McMansion. This would seriously mess up my sun exposure and air circulation. I would much rather have his collection than a monster house and its evil stockade fence as a new neighbor.
(above) My west neighbor was a child during the Depression, and as a result, he collects things that could be “useful”. Lots and lots of things. I have a row of antique roses along the fence that will eventually grow and screen out his “stuff”, but I’m not in any kind of hurry to lose my neighbor. He has been wonderful, kind, and very helpful for the 26 years I have lived here. If he were to leave, a builder would come in to bulldoze and build a huge monster of a McMansion. This would seriously mess up my sun exposure and air circulation. I would much rather have his collection than a monster house and its evil stockade fence as a new neighbor.
(above) I have some explaining to do. As you can see the row of yellow flower plants, Zexmenia, behind the Pink Skullcap, looks like it may or may not be there. They are alive, but will need some time to recover from this summer’s beating. To the right in the photo is one of two Lindheimer Muhlies which will increase in size (circumference) over the next few years. To the left of this ornamental grass in what looks to be an empty bed, are more zexmenias that are starting to form new foliage since they have been planted. All plants have a one year warranty, and if by next spring, some of them have not survived, they will be replaced.
(above) I have some explaining to do. As you can see the row of yellow flower plants, Zexmenia, behind the Pink Skullcap, looks like it may or may not be there. They are alive, but will need some time to recover from this summer’s beating. To the right in the photo is one of two Lindheimer Muhlies which will increase in size (circumference) over the next few years. To the left of this ornamental grass in what looks to be an empty bed, are more zexmenias that are starting to form new foliage since they have been planted. All plants have a one year warranty, and if by next spring, some of them have not survived, they will be replaced.
(above) Walker’s Low Catnip
(above) Walker’s Low Catnip
(above) This is what folks will see driving in the alley past my house. That is if they drive less than twenty miles an hour. Please notice how the Lace Fence is the perfect frame and finishing touch. If you’re wondering why there’s such a big gap between the back row of plants and the fence, the next two photos will do a good job of explaining.
(above) This is what folks will see driving in the alley past my house. That is if they drive less than twenty miles an hour. Please notice how the Lace Fence is the perfect frame and finishing touch. If you’re wondering why there’s such a big gap between the back row of plants and the fence, the next two photos will do a good job of explaining.
(above) Yes, the wide gap between the fence and plantings is the mulched dog run. See Bubba run. Right now it looks like a huge swath of nothing, but as the plants increase in size, the path will narrow and not be as noticeable.
(above) Yes, the wide gap between the fence and plantings is the mulched dog run. See Bubba run. Right now it looks like a huge swath of nothing, but as the plants increase in size, the path will narrow and not be as noticeable.
(above) Here’s the reason for the chain link fence — albeit a very fancy chain link fence. If you’re wondering where Bertha is, she’s snoozing on the brick steps. She’s definitely not the camera whore Bubba is.
(above) Here’s the reason for the chain link fence — albeit a very fancy chain link fence. If you’re wondering where Bertha is, she’s snoozing on the brick steps. She’s definitely not the camera whore Bubba is.

13 thoughts on “The Big Reveal!”

  1. KSCooper says:

    PA, Lovely to look at and very well thought out. What a great time of the year to be finished. Thanks for sharing your beautiful backyard.

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Thanks, Kathy. It’s a perfect time of year for this to be finalized, because of La Nina, the root systems will have more time to establish before the really cold weather sets in. It’s a win win!

  2. Margaret Downs-Gamble says:

    Oh, Patsy Ann, you must be so pleased with the results. It is airy and elegant–and servicable for the dogs! I particularly love the touch of the dianthus. Their scent in the heat will be a lovely addition to all the visual delights. What a beautiful space you have created. Bravo!

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Thank you so much, Margaret! I know everything looks kind of dinky now, but they are perennials and will just keep growing bigger and bigger.

  3. violet Harrington says:

    Wow, Patsy Ann! Beautiful. Well done.

  4. Mary nicolett says:

    I love it, and it is LOVELY weather to sit outside and enjoy it! Go! Right Now! REALLY, get off your computer and enjoy! You deserve it and I hope everything thrives, and I’m envious but delighted for you. I saw an article about how to draw purple martins to a house…. I’ll see if i can look it up and send you the link.

  5. Judy says:

    I’m sure you will get so much enjoyment from your beautiful yard.

  6. Patsy Ann says:

    Thanks so much you guys! Tonight I went to watch my niece cheer at a football game. When I came back the new path lights were on, but they’re WAY TO BRIGHT! I’m now on a mission to find less wattage.

  7. Becky says:

    Everthing is perfect.

  8. Becky says:

    The process has been so much fun to see that I don’t want it to ever get finished. Or maybe you start another project? I’m getting all kinds of vicarious pleasure watching it unfold. Thanks for sharing.

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Becky, yep, there are more projects to follow. My landscape architect and I have started planning the extension of my front yard’s shade garden. There are many steps to go through before we can implement our design. And hopefully that will be late winter or very early spring. In the mean time, there’s quite a few furniture additions that will happening over the next six months.

  9. Pat B O'Brien says:

    Oh, Patsy Ann, it is truly gorgeous!! I love the screen porch for you to absorb the beauty you have created. Luke & I will definitely stop by in the next few weeks. SOOO happy for you.

    1. Patsy Ann says:

      Thanks so much, PB’Ob!

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